Saturday, November 20, 2010

New Arrivals: Krazy Kat


Krazy & Ignatz 1931-1932: A Kat a'lilt with Song

Krazy & Ignatz 1931-1932: "A Kat Alilt with Song" is a hot-baked brickbat of a volume, adance with nearly two full years of the Sunday Krazy Kat (Herriman did not use color until 1935), snug between multiple pages of Herriman extras, including two premiere appearances of Krazy from 1909, never before reprinted; a sports page panorama of graphic fun with the French boxing champion Georges Carpentier; two extremely frank daily strip revelations about Krazy's dubious gender, with komments by Bill Blackbeard; plus an introduction by Blackbeard detailing the miraculous recovery of many of the Sunday pages in this volume from apparent newspaper oblivion, a new Debaffler page, and a stunning layout front and back and throughout by the inimitable Chris Ware!






Krazy & Ignatz 1933-1934: Necromancy by the Blue Bean Bush

Krazy & Ignatz 1933-1934 is a hot-baked brickbat of a volume, adance with nearly two full years of the Sunday Krazy Kat (Herriman did not use color until 1935), snug between multiple pages of Herriman extras, not the least of which include an introduction by Blackbeard, a new "DeBaffler" page, and layout front and back and throughout by the inimitable Chris Ware!





Krazy & Ignatz 1935-1936: A Wild Warmth of Chromatic Gravy

And now, starting with the sixth volume in Fantagraphics' acclaimed Krazy Kat reprint series, finally it's time for... color! After a brief hiatus in the mid-1930s, the heretofore black-and-white Sunday Krazy Kat returned in full spectacular color in June 1935. And so this volume includes all the Sunday strips from the latter half of 1935 and all of 1936, including one supremely rare instance of a page shot from an original syndicate proof sheet, all reproduced in sparkling, digitally cleaned-up color. The new color format also opens the floodgates for a massive amount of spectacular rare color art from series editor Bill Blackbeard's files, including a surprising color self-portrait by Herriman, several Kat watercolors executed for friends, peers, and relatives, some watercolored non-Krazy Kat material, a reproduction of a vintage archy and mehitabel dust jacket by Herriman — plus a period spoof of Krazy Kat by Minute Movies' Ed Wheelan, and several instances of other cartoonists imitating Herriman's unique "Family Upstairs / Krazy Kat" format. This volume also includes "The Kolor of Krazy Kat," a revelatory essay by journalist and critic Jeet Heer that addresses in-depth the mystery of Herriman's racial origins, and the varying ways in which Herriman dealt with them artistically throughout his career — a major addition to Herriman-related scholarship and commentary.






Krazy & Ignatz 1937-1938: Shifting Sands Dusts Its Cheeks in Powdered Beauty

George Herriman integrated full, spectacular color into Krazy Kat in June, 1935. The gorgeous evolution continues in our third color volume, which includes the Sunday strips from all of 1937 and 1938. With a full 104 Sunday pages this time around, this particular book is jam packed with little room for extras, but we did squeeze in a half-dozen or so pages' worth of never-before-seen Herriman memorabilia (all in color), including a spectacular full-color New Year's card illustration done for a friend.






Krazy & Ignatz 1941-1942: A Ragout of Raspberries

George Herriman integrated full, spectacular color into Krazy Kat in June, 1935. The gorgeous evolution continues in our fourth color volume, which includes the Sunday strips from all of 1941 and 1942. The color format opens the floodgates for a massive amount of spectacular, rare color art from series editor Bill Blackbeard and designer Chris Ware's files. Most of these strips in this volume have not seen print since originally running in Hearst newspapers over 60 years ago.






Krazy & Ignatz 1943-1944: He Nods in Quiescent Siesta

Krazy and Ignatz 1943-1944: "He Nods in Quiescent Siesta" covers the last two years of Herriman’s masterpiece. With this volume, Fantagraphics and its precursor Eclipse have reprinted the entire 29-year run of the Krazy Kat Sundays! Like Charles Schulz, George Herriman was a cartoonist to the very end. Aside from collecting the last masterful year and a half of Krazy Kat, this new volume offers a retrospective look at Herriman’s life at the drawing table, offering many never before seen samples of his original art (which the cartoonist often lovingly hand-colored for friends). Gathered from many scattered collections, these pages testify to Herriman’s invererate passion for drawing. Rounding out the volume are scores of Krazy Kat daily strips also from Herriman’s last years, further testament to the cartoonists vitality. Series editor and veteran comics historian, Bill Blackbeard, also provides a concluding, wide-ranging essay on the life and art of Herriman. More than a simple reprint collection, Krazy and Ignatz 1943-1944 portrays the full range of a cartoonist who remained an artist all his life.






The Kat Who Walked in Beauty

Presenting a unique, stand-alone companion to our Krazy & Ignatz series. The Kat Who Walked In Beauty collects many rare and unique dailies from the 1910s and 1920s. Though many readers are aware of Herriman's dynamic Sunday pages, few know that during 1920, in what must have been an editorially unrestrictive period for Herriman, he drew some of the most graphic and brilliantly conceived daily strips ever created; they look like "mini-Sunday" strips. This nine-month stretch of dailies, never-before-reprinted, is among the treasures included in this collection. The collection includes many other Herriman gems, including the very first stand-alone Krazy & Ignatz strips from 1911, and the illustrations from Herriman"s Krazy Kat Jazz pantomime/ballet, performed to captivated New York audiences in 1922. This book fills in several gaps in the daily strip history, reproduced at close to their original size.






Krazy & Ignatz: Tiger Tea

Krazy Kat's most surreal adventures were the famed Tiger Tea sequence where Krazy Kat imbibed of the psychedelia-inducing substance. This is George Herriman at his best, presented in the same era as Terry and the Pirates and Captain Easy. Krazy & Ignatz: Tiger Tea showcases a rare photo of Herriman sporting a Mexican sombrero and smoking a funny-looking cigarette.





These books, and thousands of others, can be purchased from:

Brickbat Books
709 South Fourth Street
Philadelphia, PA 19147

215 592 1207

Open every day, 11am to 7pm.

We accept Visa, MC, Amex, Paypal and cash.

Saturday, November 13, 2010

Featured: Five From The Folio Society


Kurt Vonnegut, Slaughterhouse-Five

Introduced by John Sutherland.
Bound in buckram printed with a design by John Holder.
Set in Utopia with Futura display.
7 full-page colour paintings by John Holder

On the night of 13 February 1945, Vonnegut was a POW sheltering in an underground abattoir as British night bombers destroyed Dresden. Miraculously he survived but it would be more than twenty years before he would write about the full horror of the city's decimation and its aftermath. In a brilliant blend of science fiction, history and memoir Slaughterhouse-Five tells the surreal story of Billy Pilgrim. Billy has 'come unstuck in time' and finds himself catapulted between his experience as an American GI in Nazi Germany, his post-war life as a successful optometrist and his capture by aliens who imprison him on the planet Tralfamadore where, as well as being welcomed into the pneumatic bosom of former Earthling starlet Montana Wildhack, he discovers that time, like death, is illusory.

Kurt Vonnegut's black satiric voice exposes the cruelties and aberrations of the human condition in a book that takes its place alongside All Quiet on the Western Front and Catch-22 as one of the greatest anti-war novels ever written.





John Reed, Ten Days That Shook The World

Preface by John Simpson
Bound in cloth, printed and blocked with a design by Frances Button based on a poster from the 1917 Russian Revolution
Set in Utopia with Antique Olive display

The Bolshevik revolution that would sweep away the old order, end Russian involvement in the First World War and set communism in motion took place over just a few days in October and November 1917. A young American journalist, John Reed, witnessed the stirring events taking place and was swept along with them - entering the Winter Palace alongside Bolshevik troops. His celebrated account, written in the flush of revolutionary zeal, sizzles with breathless energy as Reed paces the streets of Petrograd, talking to workers, peasants newly arrived from the country and soldiers on leave. He attends meetings, picks up handbills and records sounds, sights - even smells - with impressionistic immediacy. His observations of Lenin, 'dressed in shabby clothes, his trousers much too long for him,' or Trotsky, 'fiery, indefatigable, giving orders, answering questions' provide a fascinating portrait of those larger-than-life figures.






George Orwell, Nineteen Eighty-Four

Printed on Canton Wove paper and bound in Cambric grained material printed with an illustrated design by Steven Devine
Illustrated throughout by Steven Devine





Barbara Tuchman, The March Of Folly

Set in Utopia
Printed on Abbey Wove paper and bound in full cloth
Illustrated slipcase

"Twice a winner of the Pulitzer Prize, author Barbara Tuchman tackles the pervasive presence of folly in governments through the ages. Defining folly as the pursuit by governments of policies contrary to their own interersts, despite the availability of feasible alternatives, Tuchman details four decisive turning points in history that illustrate the very heights of folly in government: the Trojan War, the breakup of the Holy See provoked by the Renaissance Popes, the loss of the American colonies by Britain's George III, and the United States' persistent folly in Vietnam. THE MARCH OF FOLLY brings the people, places, and events of history magnificently alive for today's reader."





Flann O'Brien, The Third Policeman

Typeset in Garamond
Printed on Caxton Wove paper
Bound in green cloth blocked with a design by David Eccles
Illustrations by David Eccles

The great bicycle novel. If you ever paid $800 for a pair of rims, you need to read this book.




These books, and thousands of others, can be purchased from:

Brickbat Books
709 South Fourth Street
Philadelphia, PA 19147

215 592 1207

Open every day, 11am to 7pm.

We accept Visa, MC, Amex, Paypal and cash.

Friday, November 12, 2010

Featured: Two More Classic Modern Library Editions


D.H. Lawrence, Sons And Lovers






Joseph Conrad, Victory




These books, and thousands of others, can be purchased from:

Brickbat Books
709 South Fourth Street
Philadelphia, PA 19147

215 592 1207

Open every day, 11am to 7pm.

We accept Visa, MC, Amex, Paypal and cash.

Thursday, November 11, 2010

FEATURED: Ant and Bee



...hard to think of a better example of the Japanese idea of Heta-uma (bad-good art.) Or maybe its Heta-heta (see below.) I can't even imagine how an adult writes books like these. They're completely guileless. The illustrations remind me of certain aspects of Ernest Shepard's illustrations for the Pooh books. They touch on reality in a baffling way, without actually being realistic: Shepard's Roo appears to be either a semi-fetal kangaroo, or a beyond filthy Mike Kelly stuffed doll, and Rabbit's "Friends and relations" appear to be grubby little insects.

Banner's Ant & Bee follow a similar model. Although drawn in a crude pictographic style, they maintain realistic details which makes us react to them the way we would react to a real ant or bee. I'm not sure what my point is, but this is pretty terrific stuff. Its selling pretty quickly too, so stop by the store and check it out before it all disappears...



"[King Terry] believes that there are essentially four types of art:
(1) Heta-uma [Bad-good]-a high level of achievement, requiring great practice. The goal to be attained.

(2) Uma-uma [Good-good]-the truly amazing "professionals," those who can astound everyone with their works. The creme de la creme.

(3) Heta-heta [Bad-bad]-the truely bad amateur, who has neither technique nor sensibility. The average person.

(4) Uma-heta [Good-bad]-the professional whose technique is good but whose work lacks life. No soul."
- from 'Dreamland Japan' by Frederik L. Schodt





Ant And Bee And The Rainbow SOLD!
Hardcover (out of print and scarce)

Ant And Bee And The Doctor $95.00
Hardcover (out of print and scarce)





Ant And Bee And The Secret SOLD!
Hardcover (out of print and scarce)


Ant And Bee Go Shopping SOLD!
Hardcover (out of print and scarce)


Ant And Bee And The ABC SOLD!
Hardcover (out of print and scarce)

Wednesday, November 10, 2010

Featured: Two Classic Modern Library Editions


Daphne Du Maurier, Rebecca
Cover by McKnight Kauffer







Isak Dinesen, Seven Gothic Tales





These books, and thousands of others, can be purchased from:

Brickbat Books
709 South Fourth Street
Philadelphia, PA 19147

215 592 1207

Open every day, 11am to 7pm.

We accept Visa, MC, Amex, Paypal and cash.

Tuesday, November 9, 2010

Featured: Two Covers by Edward Gorey


The Looking Glass Book Of Stories
Hardcover in dust jacket






Complete Stories And Poems Of Edgar Allan Poe
Hardcover in dust jacket




Also just in:

War Of The Worlds
Hardcover, illustrated boards





The Awdrey Gore Legacy
Hardcover, illustrated boards





These books, and thousands of others, can be purchased from:

Brickbat Books
709 South Fourth Street
Philadelphia, PA 19147

215 592 1207

Open every day, 11am to 7pm.

We accept Visa, MC, Amex, Paypal and cash.

Thursday, November 4, 2010

Featured: Bears by Ruth Krauss



Along with Margaret Wise Brown, Ruth Krauss was one of the pillars of post-war children's literature. She was also a mentor to the young Maurice Sendak. His illustrations for a new edition of her early book, Bears, is very nice, but the long out of print earlier edition from 1949 is a killer. Phyllis Rowand's illustrations are amazing, and from what I've seen, her other books are equally beautiful. The Harper boys need to get off their asses and reprint this stuff. Ditto for Ruth Krauss. The Carrot Seed and A Hole Is To Dig are wonderful, but the woman wrote a hell of a lot of books. So come on, let's see some more Ruth!




(interior images from miekewillems.blogspot.com)

Bears
Ruth Krauss, illustrated by Phyllis Rowand
Hardcover, illustrated boards (1949 edition)
out of print





Bears
Ruth Krauss, illustrated by Maurice Sendak
Hardcover, illustrated boards (2005)

Wednesday, November 3, 2010

FEATURED: Lorraine Hansberry's The Movement





The Movement
Lorraine Hansberry, photography by Danny Lyon, et al.
Paper wraps (out of print)



These books, and thousands of others, can be purchased from:

Brickbat Books
709 South Fourth Street
Philadelphia, PA 19147

215 592 1207

Open every day, 11am to 7pm.

We accept Visa, MC, Amex, Paypal and cash.

We ship anywhere.